Java Application Storage Options for Google App Engine

For Java developers building applications for deployment to the Google App Engine (GAE) data storage is a primary consideration. Web applications typically connect to a relational database for storage. On first glance at GAE it is surprising to see that there is no relational database facility. How then do applications persist, query and retrieve data ?

GAE provides Java developers with three options for persisting data. Standard Java provides two API’s for persisting objects to relational databases, JPA and JDO. GAE provides support for both of these libraries which means that developers can write code using these standard API’ as though the application is using a relational database. GAE stores the data behind the scenes in its own scalable storage facility. In this way the application code is not tied to GAE API’s and can be readily ported to other platforms. The other storage option available is to use GAE’s datastore facility which is a scalable, schemaless storage facility that can be queried based on object properties. The datastore is accessible via a simple Java API. The GAE JDO and JPA implementations map data to the datastore.

Anybody considering developing Java Web applications for GAE is initially surprised at the lack of a relational database. However, the Google approach with the datastore is also mirrored by Microsoft with their Azure Table storage and also Amazon with Amazon SimpleDB. All provide highly scalable storage facilities. A difference between Google and the offerings of Microsoft and Amazon is that they both also offer traditional relational databases as part of their storage offerings.

From this discussion it is clear that developing applications for the cloud, there are many options for storage, provided by many different vendors. If you would like to learn more about these why not consider attending Learning Trees Cloud Computing course where we discuss these storage facilities in detail and compare and contrast them on both technical and commercial merits.

Chris

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